Clueless in Gaza

As in previous conflicts, Israel claims its right to defend itself in its current conflict with Hamas in the Gaza Strip. But its response, killing hundreds of civilians in response to the deaths of a few Israelis, is wildly disproportional and thus a violation of international law.

10 thoughts on “Clueless in Gaza

      • What do you expect, dealing with Jews? From their holy Torah to yesterday’s utterances by Netanhayu and co, Jews see themselves as an elevated race beyond any moral reproach. They feel no compunction about stealing or killing to further their own interests but when called on it, Ashaver turns into a helpless creature wronged so many times. “The Nazis, The Russians, The Poles – all these goyim have been so cruel to us nice innocent Jews” they cry. And when people of good sense agree and turn thier backs, Ashaver reaches out and picks our pockets.

        If anyone doubts the influence Jews have in the US, just ask why do we support Israel? They have been nothing but our misfortune for the last 70 years as they’ve attempted genocide of the native population and then hid behind us when the Arabs get angry, so why does the US still support them?

      • FlemingBalzac – I agree with much of what you say, with the exception of applying it to ALL Jews. Not all Jews support the occupation of Palestine and the slaughter of the Palestinian people.

        In general, every religion teaches that its people are special. Everyone else is going to hell, or won’t be reincarnated or whatever. Studies have shown that religionists are much more prone to prejudice than rationalists.

        However, not all religionists fall into that trap, just not all Jews feel they have a God Given Right to kill Palestinians.

        Read this: As a holocaust survivor, AIPAC doesn’t speak for me

      • Good points, CrazyH, which need to be made. I am not certain that «every religion teaches that its people are special. Everyone else is going to hell, or won’t be reincarnated or whatever.», but that certainly does seem to be the case for (the major sects of) the Abrahamic religions, i e, Judaism, Christendom, and Islam. Nor does one have to be religious to believe that one’s people have a special or «manifest» destiny, or constitute the single «indispensable» nation, although religious belief – or at least, professions of religious belief – often seem to accompany those feelings of being exceptional. I suspect that a majority of Jews who do not believe that they have a divine right to murder Palestinians and take their land from them are so-called «cultural» rather than «religious» Jews ; i e, that they, contrary to the latter, do not regard the Tanakh, particularly the Torah, as a history book which describes the special relation supposedly obtaining between a «god» and a certain group of people….

        The odd thing is that theologians – particularly ones from the Abrahamic religions – are often asked to comment on moral questions. Given the (real) history of these sects (not the one taught in Friday/Saturday/Sunday School), one would have thought that these would be just the people to avoid….

        Henri

      • M. Henri –

        Yeah, yer right on that – true Buddhists are humble people fer instance. I was thinking mostly about the Abrahamic & Hindu religions.

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