The Best-Case Scenario for Republicans Stripping Americans of Healthcare

Fearful of the political repercussions of stripping 23 million Americans of healthcare, Congressional Republicans are debating Trumpcare reform with a minimum of transparency, How do Republicans think this will work out for them in the long run?

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11 thoughts on “The Best-Case Scenario for Republicans Stripping Americans of Healthcare

  1. > How do Republicans think this will work out for them in the long run?

    They’re cutting taxes for the rich. I predict this will work out just fine, they have a long history of screwing the little guy & getting reelected for their troubles.

  2. The R’s plan is better wealth care
    Eliminate the high income earner’s health tax
    Some of the 22 million uninsured will live long enough to pay into Social Security but will die before collecting benifts. Blame them for poor choices then empty out their accounts for any unpaid medical bills.
    If people die just before collecting Social Security there will less of a need to raise the cap on income taxed for Social Security.
    Still a few R’s think it is not enough, more cuts are needed.

  3. I just watched Robert Reich on Facebook with his “Resistance Report” of today’s date. I sent him a message to please stop referring to “Trumpcare” — it’s Trump-Don’t-Care.

  4. Single payer healthcare would solve the problem, but Democrats took that option off the table when they had control during Obama’s first two years.

    The two parties really don’t want a solution that would deprive the free-loading owner class of the free money-for-nothing that the low overhead Medicare for All would deny them.

    Keep on cheering for your favorite party of the duopoly. And don’t tell the dumb dead guy in Ted’s cartoon how he became duopoly policy road kill.

    • And, the funny thing is, Obama took single payer away before they even began debating about the ACA. Folks on the right want to Target Obama as a communist, the guy was barely a right of center Reagan Republican.

  5. Candidate Trump promised to replace the ACA with a plan that had better coverage, and much lower premiums, deductibles, and co-pays. President Trump says the AHCA has much better coverage, and much lower premiums, deductibles, and co-pays.

    Any idiot can see that the AHCA eliminates Medicaid, which covers about 20 million poor people. It also reduces coverage and increases premiums, deductibles, and co-pays for those older than 45.

    But it does reduce the premiums, deductibles, and co-pays for the job creators as a percentage of their after-tax income.

    So the AHCA is an unqualified success!

  6. I can’t help but think that the whole thing is a charade. The GOP is pretending to want health care for the United States citizenry and are leading them around by the nose, knowing full well that they cannot successfully replace the ACA with something better. Are the American People being duped? And for what purpose?

  7. In 2015, 16.9 % of the US GDP was spent on health care, far highest among the 35 OECD countries listed (Switzerland was next at 11.5 %, Japan third at 11.2 %, we here in Sweden fourth at 11.1 %). One measure of outcome is life expectancy ; on that measure in 2014, the US was fifth from the bottom at 81.2 years, followed by Turkey at 80.7, Hungary and Latvia at 79.4, and Mexico, with a life expectancy of 77.5 years, at the bottom. Another frequently used indicator of health status is infant mortality, in 2013, the US ranked fourth from the bottom at 6 deaths per 1000 live births, followed by Chile at 7, Turkey at 10.8, with Mexico again at the bottom at 13 deaths per 1000 live births….

    My god, how the money rolls in….

    Henri

    • In 2015, 16.9 % of the US GDP was spent on health care, far highest among the 35 OECD countries listed (Switzerland was next at 11.5 %, Japan third at 11.2 %, we here in Sweden fourth at 11.1 %). One measure of outcome is life expectancy ; on that measure in 2014, the US was fifth from the bottom at 81.2 years, followed by Turkey at 80.7, Hungary and Latvia at 79.4, and Mexico, with a life expectancy of 77.5 years, at the bottom (see the source named above). Another frequently used indicator of health status is infant mortality (same source as above), in 2013, the US ranked fourth from the bottom at 6 deaths per 1000 live births, followed by Chile at 7, Turkey at 10.8, with Mexico again at the bottom at 13 deaths per 1000 live births….

      My god, how the money rolls in….

      Henri

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