SYNDICATED COLUMN: Trump, the Pussy Tape and a Bunch of Lazy Journalists

Image result for trump access hollywood            “The tape, without question, is real.”

I expected better from The New York Times.

The quote is the lede of a news story by Daniel Victor, a reporter at the Times. Victor’s piece is about a controversy, or more precisely, an echo of a controversy: the 2005 “Access Hollywood” recording in which Donald Trump is heard joking with show host Billy Bush about grabbing women’s genitals. The audio (you don’t see Trump’s face during the gutter talk) was released shortly before a major debate against Hillary Clinton; it nearly cost Trump the election.

Perhaps in an effort to distance himself from the big sexual harassment discussion, Trump has lately been telling people that the audio wasn’t real — that it wasn’t him saying all that sexist stuff. “We don’t think that was my voice,” he told a senator recently.

Trump’s denial-come-lately (he apologized at the time) is being ridiculed. “Mr. Trump’s falsehoods about the ‘Access Hollywood’ tape are part of his lifelong habit of attempting to create and sell his own version of reality,” Maggie Haberman and Jonathan Martin of the Times wrote. Senator Jeff Flake said: “It’s dangerous to democracy; you’ve got to have shared facts…that was your voice on that tape, you admitted it before.”

Trump lies a lot. He may be lying here. I don’t know.

The point is, neither does The New York Times.

            What disturbs me more than the possibility/likelihood that the president is a liar is the fact that journalists who ought to know better, including six-figure reporters employed by prestigious media organizations like The New York Times that repeatedly brag about adhering to high standards, are too lazy and/or ignorant to conduct basic due diligence. This isn’t new: I have been the subject of news articles for which the news outlet didn’t call me for comment (calling for comment is journalism 101). But journalistic laziness is still shocking and wrong.

A news article that begins with an unambiguous declarative statement like “The tape, without question, is real” ought to contain proof — or at least strong evidence — that there really is no question.

Victor’s piece does not come close to meeting basic journalistic standards. Victor quotes a host from “Access Hollywood” who says that’s Trump on the tape. Mostly he relies on Trump’s 2016 apology: “I said it, I was wrong, and I apologize.” But so what? I can say I was on the grassy knoll but that doesn’t mean I really shot JFK.

I don’t like Trump either. But it’s reckless and irresponsible to report as news, as proven fact, something that you don’t know for certain.

The sloppy reporting about the authenticity of the Trump tape reminds me of the breathtaking absence of due diligence exercised by The Los Angeles Times when it fired me as its cartoonist. There too the story centered on an audio.

I wrote in a Times online blog that an LAPD cop had roughed me up and handcuffed me while arresting me for jaywalking in 2001. The police chief gave the Times’ publisher an audio the cop secretly made of the arrest. The audio was mostly inaudible noise, yet the Times said the fact that it didn’t support my account (or the officer’s) proved I had lied. I had the audio “enhanced” (cleaned up); the enhanced version did support my version of events. Embarrassed and/or scared of offending the LAPD (whose pension fund owned stock in the Times’ parent company, Tronc), the Times refused to retract their demonstrably false story about my firing. I’m suing them for defamation.

Where my former employer went wrong was that they didn’t investigate thoroughly. They were careless. They didn’t bother to have the audio authenticated or enhanced before firing me and smearing me in print.

Back to the Trump tape.

Editors and reporters at any newspaper, but especially one the size of the New York Times, which has considerable resources at its disposal, ought to know that proper reporting about audio or video requires both authentication and enhancement.

Proper forensic authentication of a recording like the “Access Hollywood” recording of Trump is a straightforward matter. First, you need both the original tape as well as the device with which it was made. A copy or duplicate of an audio or video cannot be authenticated. The tape and recording device are analyzed by an expert in a sound studio for signs of splicing or other tampering. The identity of a speaker can never be 100% ascertained, but comparisons with known recordings of voices (as well as background noise from the original recording location) can provide meaningful indications as to whether a recording really is what and who it is purported to be. (The LA Times didn’t do that in my case. Anyway, they couldn’t. All they had was a copy, a dub — and you can’t authenticate a copy.)

My situation with the LA Times highlights the importance of enhancement. Had the paper’s management paid for a proper enhancement, they would have heard what lay “beneath” a track of wind and passing traffic: a woman shouting “Take off his handcuffs!” at my arresting officer.

            Do I believe Trump’s denials? No.

Is the media right to say Trump is lying about the Billy Bush recording? Also no.

Because the media have offered no evidence as to the recording’s authenticity. For all we know, the original tape was never released. I’d be shocked if the recording device was released. And I’d be triple-shocked if those two items were sent to a professional audio expert for authentication.

A president who is an evil, dimwitted, underqualified megalomaniac is a danger to democracy.

So is a lazy, cheap, cut-and-paste class of journalists who don’t bother to thoroughly investigate stories.

(Ted Rall’s (Twitter: @tedrall) next book is “Francis: The People’s Pope,” the latest in his series of graphic novel-format biographies. Publication date is March 13, 2018. You can support Ted’s hard-hitting political cartoons and columns and see his work first by sponsoring his work on Patreon.)

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9 thoughts on “SYNDICATED COLUMN: Trump, the Pussy Tape and a Bunch of Lazy Journalists

      • To my mind, mein verehreter Lehre, a lighthouse with its lamps turned of and its Fresnel lens busted. It has never seen a US war of aggression abroad of which it did not approve – at least in its initial stages – and has historically been as good a redbaiter as its more overtly reactionary compatriots. It is now heavily engaged in pushing the «Russians hacked the US elections» meme (perhaps slightly less so than its eminent colleague, the WaPo). Unlike Herr Schwarte, Ted is quite aware of all this, which is why I addressed the question to him….

        Henri

  1. Amazing that the garbled LAPD tape dub “proves” your guilt to the LAT, and that the crystal clear broadcast quality audio that Trump recognized as his own voice and words is insufficient to prove anything to the NYT.

    Seems a double standard is in play at the “Newspaper of Record”.

    AKA, lies.

  2. Times change. Once, newspapers had copy editors, fact checkers, editors, and reporters who went out, and reported what they saw with their own eyes. Those days were suitable to the troglodyte era, but can no longer be supported. The modern news agency must publish whatever its readers want to read. Facts, proof, and evidence have no place in modern journalism.

    Trump and Mr Rall have been found guilty by the MSM. Anyone who questions the MSM is obviously a tinfoil hat wearing conspiracy theorist who thinks all the reporters working for all the major news outlets are conspiring to lie about what really happened.

    But, of course, the US has only 4 conglomerates who own almost all of the news media, and all four have agreed on what is true, so any reporter who strays will be fired. So he ‘conspiracy’ is among just 3 people (the 4th, Murdock, tells different lies).

    • “Anyone who questions the MSM is obviously a tinfoil hat wearing conspiracy theorist who thinks all the reporters working for all the major news outlets are conspiring to lie about what really happened.”
      *
      That sounds like you’re talking about the 9/11 attacks on the World Trade Center. (?)

  3. I don’t believe Trump’s denials either.

    But Billy Bush shouldn’t have been fired. Smiling and nodding and encouraging your interviewee are required skills for a good interviewer. You make the mark comfortable, draw them out, and who knows? Maybe they’ll confess to something they wouldn’t admit in otherwise.

    Rather than condemnation, Bush deserves a freakin’ Pulitzer.

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